Functional Movement Screen

“If you don’t have time to do it right, when will you have time to do it over?”: Recognizing faulty movement with the Functional Movement Screen (FMS)

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If you have been following our Facebook page, you know that the physical therapists at MOSAIC have introduced the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) into our practice.  I’ve provided little snippets of information on it, but below is a more comprehensive explanation as to how the FMS will be used at MOSAIC.  I don’t want this post to be a regurgitation of already excellently written material.  For more general information on the FMS, click on the websites provided.

At MOSAIC, we use the FMS as a tool, with patients or clients who do not have pain, to identify faulty and asymmetrical movement patterns .  We utilize the cousin of the FMS- the Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) with patients who have pain (more on that in a different post).  We look at 7 movements that are key to normal function. These movements address functional mobility, functional stability, and functional motor control.  Limitations in performance can indicate a higher risk of injury or reduce the effectiveness of training.  Research indicates that a score below 14, especially if there are asymmetries in performance, is indicative of higher injury risk. From the score that is generated, we can then prescribe the most beneficial corrective exercises to improve function and optimize performance.

Here are some real-life examples as to how we utilize FMS at MOSAIC:

MOSAIC patient who had an ACL replacement:

This patient is a twenty-something year old who injured his knee playing soccer.  He has excelled though the traditional ACL-rehab program and now wants to return to playing sports.  He has full knee range of motion, excellent strength when tested with a manual muscle test, and no swelling.  This would be the discharge criteria for some physical therapists.   However- below is the results of his FMS:

Test Total Score (0-3)
Deep Squat

1

Hurdle Step

1

Inline Lunge

2

Shoulder Mobility

1

Active Straight Leg Raise

1

Trunk Stability Push-up

2

Rotary Stability

1

TOTAL:

9

If this patient was discharged now, he would most likely injure himself again.  Though he may excel at individual impairments, when requiring the body to move as a whole, he displays dysfunctional movement.  The beauty of this system is that it tells the therapist where to begin.  We would address any movements that have a low score or improve any asymmetries first.  Of those low scores, we would address any mobility issues, before progressing to more challenging stability and motor control movements.

My husband who wants to improve his golf game:

The FMS is an excellent tool for athletes, weekend warriors, and people who just want to move better.  I wrote a few months ago on FB about my husband’s questions of “Why, after I lift heavy, does my golf swing suffer?”   I’m no golf pro, but let’s look at his FMS score.  My husband is fit, and besides golf participates in an insane Cross-fit meets Boot Camp style group class a few days a week and does heaving weight lifting the other days.

Test Total Score (0-3)
Deep Squat

1

Hurdle Step

2

Inline Lunge

2

Shoulder Mobility

1

Active Straight Leg Raise

1

Trunk Stability Push-up

3

Rotary Stability

2

TOTAL:

12

My muscle-bound husband cannot MOVE!  For him, the first thing I addressed was shoulder mobility, which actually improved dramatically with one corrective exercise.  He now does this before and during his golf game and his swing is much better.

The philosophy behind the FMS is the concept that the whole body moves in synergistic patterns.  Faulty movement will compromise the pattern’s integrity.  Training a specific movement pattern with a major dysfunction will only reinforce poor motor control, because the information from the joints is distorted so that automatic reactions are altered resulting in further compensation.  The importance of the FMS with either our rehab or functional training clients, is that is gives us a framework to recognize these faulty movements and address them before injury occurs.

For more inforation: http://www.functionalmovement.com/http://www.advanced-fitness-concepts.com/fms.pdf

As always- Thanks for reading,

Dr. Sally

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